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] >>> tonight on c-span the house intelligence committee holds a hearing ons nsa surveillance program and later trayvon martin's mother testifying at the hearing on stand your ground laws. .. only those recognized to speak will be allowed to. >> and those who are not in compliance will be removed from the committee room. i would like to welcome our first panel today. the director of the national intelligence james clapper deputy attorney james cole national security or keith alexander the deputy director of the nsa chris ingalls. following the first panel we will move immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing will provide an open forum to discuss amendments to the surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled at the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how the proposal is under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur and encourage members to answer questio
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration at congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks. i am going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following the opening statement and your opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day to get some things clarified for the record. it will be important for the american people. .e do expect a vote we will hold as long as we can. we will take a brief intermission. there are only two votes. we should be able to recess or a short time and return. i will recognize any opening comment. for comingu, panel, here today. hopefully, we will get the facts on the table and let the american people understand what we do and how we do it.
. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. >> the head of the n.s.a. defiantly defending the spy agency. the general says gathering intelligence around the world is critical and helps to keep america safe from terrorists. >> the war raging in syria claiming some surprising new victims. children are being diagnosed with polio because they don't have access to adequate health care. >> it is reported that at 8:58 p.m., a huge object believing to be a meteor right fell on a farm. >> 75 years ago, martians innovated the planet or people listening to the radio thought they did. a look back at the war of the world broadcast that caused widespread panic across the country. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good to have you with us on this wednesday. two hours from now, the health and human services secretary will testify. >> many are saying she should be fired. >> kathleen see bellous will be asked to explain the failure of the health care website. we have more on what she might say today. >> good morning. you know, kathleen
♪ >>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz, live in new york. >> the nsa denies reports president obama knew about and approved the spying on germany's chancellor. >> after months held hostage farc frees a u.s. marine. >> syria submits a plan for getting rid of its chemical weapons three days before the deadline. >> remembering rock pioneer lou reed. the former velvet underground died at the age of 71, today. [ ♪ theme ] >>> international uproar over reports the u.s. spied on germany's chancellor is not going away. there are claims president obama knew about the phone taps and approved them - the white house says it is not true. we are getting reports that the eavesdropping started in 2002, before angela merkel was elected. >> this morning senator jeanne shaheen called on the nsa to come clear on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we hav
and around the world. we have great show for you today. we'll start with nsa spying and uproar it caused in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came
the world. this has been making big news abroad. the directors of national intelligence and the nsa will testify on capitol hill today about u.s. surveillance at home and around the world. >> meanwhile, president obama has ordered a review of intelligence gathering outside of the country where as hala says, this has been big news, trying to calm what has become an international diplomatic storm. here's his take. >> that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> let's bring in elyse la by the at the state department. here's the question that not just in the united states but outside of the united states people have. what can you tell us about president obama possibly ordering the nsa to stop spy ong leaders of allied states and did he know this spying was going on when it was indeed happening? >> well, in terms of what he knew and when he knew it, none of us really know. the white house is saying that president obama knew this summer when an internal review that was started revealed that this was happ
that would limit the nsa's ability to gather information. randall pinkston joins us at capitol hill. what happened in those nsa hearings today? >> well, tony, the hearing ended an hour ago after an unusual three and a half hours technique. the members of the house select committee on intelligence complimented the work of the national security agency which as you know are under fire since the revelation by former nsa analyst edward snowden that revealed documents that showed that they had been listen together phone conversation or scooping up the phone numbers of conversation of american citizens. the director of national intelligence said that the information was gathered legally, and the content is only available to a handful of people. >> everything that we do on this program is audited 100%. on the business records. 100%. the da data is kept separate frm all the other data we have. it's important to understand that the leaker did not have access to this data period. >> so randall, are these hearings setting the stage for the usa freedom act, and if so what would that legislation mean?
need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have had to set up institutions and structures where we try to balance these competing national interest. in thethe ways we did it 70's was to create intelligence communities and ensure that all --bers of each community was ultimately it is the president's call. they help make a judgment about what politically we are able to achieve in terms of intelligence collection. . host: if you have questions for our guest, you can call in on the phone lines -- if you want to send us an e- .ail, we will take those momentarily. michael allen speaking global strategy hearing d.c.. he is also an author of "linking red." has intelligence gathering and sharing got better after 9/11? guest: absolutely. we have rebuilt the intelligence infrastructure so we can share information better. this is what my book
from germany to australia. one report claiming not only was the nsa tapping the private cell phone of the chancellor of germany, angela merkel, ever since 2010, but that president obama knew about it. the nsa hitting back, trashing the report with this statement, saying, general alexander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 this alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel. newsroom reports claiming otherwise are simply not true. germany may be in the spotlight, but that's one of just 30 countries. u.s. allies saying they're furious at the alleged extent of nsa surveillance on their turf. today, the u.s. ambassador to spain was called in for a dressing down by the spanish foreign minister. a spanish newspaper publishing a shocking number, 60. 6-0 million phone calls of average citizens intercepted by the nsa in the past year alone. so joining me now, christiane amanpour, cnn's chief international correspondent and a professor at princeton university. christiane to you, fi
overall gagss of nsa had been monitoring millions of citizens and heads of state around the world and we have more. >> reporter: the u.s. government practice of listening in on the phone calls of leaders of allied countries could be about to end. in an interview president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose, to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure that what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean it's what they should be doing. this is prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of angela merkel's phone in 2010. anonymous officials say that is not true and that a white house review only discovered the surveillance of world leaders in the summer and say the bugging of merkel's phone and soon after. a delegation from the european parliament that is visiting washington is also worried about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizens. one report from spain suggests the nsa tracked 60 million calls in the country in the space of a month. >> we need
to have that level playing field if we're going to succeed. >> does, do the geopolitical tensions over nsa stuff, is that damaging to the prospects of a t-tip agreement? >> look, it is obviously a serious issue that is out there. our view is that these issues are to be kept on separate tracks, in the right lanes of dialogue between officials on both sides. you have heard from a number of europeans that they see the logic of moving ahead with t- tip. it is important to their growth strategy to tighter -- to try to maintain competitiveness. we are hopeful we will continue to make progress on that. we have teams in brussels. there are negotiations that had to be canceled during the shutdown of the government but are back on track. we expect to continue those discussions in the coming weeks. >> a number of people have mentioned regulatory alignment, in autos. can you give us more detail of what that means in practice? if you are bmw, what are the challenges of having different regulatory regimes on both sides of the atlantic? >> one is obvious the crash testing. cars have to be crash tested in
coming out swinging. finally someone in the administration defense nsa spying. their defense was clear, and aggressive. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america our intelligence services our leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they continue to try. it is the great members in the intelligence community, our military, our law enforcement that have stood up and said, this is our job. >> defending themselves with passion and conviction, which up to this point we hadn't seen much of in terms of defense. jim sciutto closely watched the entire hearing today. jim, what were the revelations at the hearing? >> reporter: you got the sense as you say, erin, they were just waiting to go have the chance to push back like this. they pushed back very strong here. first on spying both clapper and alexander saying that our allies spy on us, including on our leaders, that in fact the intelligence services in europe do so to an e
worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f philippines. ten years old, female, philippines. we deliberately kept the camera a little bit far a
with the current dustup over the n.s.a. and over our, you know, alleged espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? >> i guess it is pretty much acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the white house and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if they haven't acknowledged it? anyway. >> the statement about angela merkel is that the united states is not and will not be listening in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. it was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- >> not specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the security would have been the intelligence assessments. without saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of some assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country but you don't know whether that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. so the source is -- they don't describe in the repo
definition of self-defense. this is a tough time for nsa. everyone says, what are you doing and why are you doing it? when we get together, we actually say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today and telling you why thenfended these programs having give them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and have people killed. span,is weekend on c- intelligence officials defend the nsa intelligence program at a house hearing. saturday at 10 a.m. eastern. live funds on c-span 2, your phone calls and comments for kitty kelley. both tv's noon on "in-depth." in november,end remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness events surrounding the assassination. sundays at 3 p.m. eastern. >> this painting was originally painted as my grandmother's .fficial white house portrait in the 1960s, lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of first ladies to bring hang in the white house. they thought it was important. she looked h
the better part of six months to sign up. it will be all right. >> it may be more than that. the nsa has a 1.4 billion utah data storage facility that keeps burning up due to electrical surges. ten meltdowns in the first 13 months. >> there are big website problems with obama care. i think what is refreshing right now is crickets of this obama care are starting to look at how do we fix it? how to fund this thing, we can't accept it as the new law. and we should remember that as this program was rolled out in massachusetts in 2006, it took roughly three years before major problems with the system began to get fixed. so, i think insurance companies involved with this and analysts i talked with will tell you the insurance companies want to wait until they are not going to rush to judgment in the first three weeks based on whether or not there were web glitches. >> 36 states are affected by this. what do you think? >> call it what you will. whatever you think about the whole concept and idea of obama care, the execution has been disastrous. this undermined a lot of confidence in the program,
. angry allies.>>> good morning. angry allies. the nsa scandal getting even wider this morning. as many as 35 world leaders spied on by the u.s. some now demanding answers. so what did president obama know and when? >>> breaking news overnight. the doctor convicted in michael jackson's death free from jail. why conrad murray was freed after serving only half his sentence. >>> and ground breaker. rock icon lou reed is remembered this morning after passing away at the age of 71. his influence on a generation of artists today, monday, october 28th, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is "today." with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >>> good morning, welcome to "today" on a monday morning. >> i'm savannah guthrie alongside al roker and natalee moralis. >> hey, sugar, take a walk on the wild side. >> can we turn that up a bit. >> i remember playing that m freshman year as a disc jockey. great song. >> tributes are pouring all in. we'll have more on the death of lou reed. >>> new revelations on the nsa spying program. this morning, some of our clo
the n.s.a. this time it involves spying on u.n. secretary ban ki-moon. the "new york times" says the intelligence agencies intercepted talking points prior to moon's visit to president obama last april. the disclosure was considered an operational highlight in a top-secret report. the white house is not commenting on the article. there are reports that the administration ordered an end to surveillance of the organization. >> pakistan is re-evaluating relationships with the u.s. after the drone strike killed a top level ofcial. hakimullah mehsud was buried secretly. pakistan's ministers denounced the killing saying it sabotaged peace talks. >> efforts have been ambushed. it was not a fire from the front. it was an ambush. we see it as an ambush. >> some lawmakers went as farce as to demand u.s. supply lines into afghanistan be stopped. >> authorities filed murder charges against a man they say opened fire inside terminal 3 inside los angeles airport. officials say the shooter ignored ticket and baggage handlers, but was intent on taking out his rage on t.s.a. agents. brian rooney
the last piece of week or two, u.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies u.s.nsa is outside the and is not governed by statutes. it is governed partially by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those reduction provide any -- any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated and he is right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and their allies safe. and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in new york and other parts of the world to make sure -- in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. we can do certain things is not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what is the benefit we are receiving and what a
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
have a big place outs dchq, which is a huge listening -- like your nsa, a huge listening -- i'm assuming, as i pay my taxes, that they're listening to everybody. >> yes, i hope so. and who is that lady that -- >> what they're not doing, i'm assuming, is taking notes. i think where we went wrong with the u.s. administration, joe, they wrote it down that they were listen to go angela merkel. >> that's what happens. who's that lady that tells daniel craig what to do? >> m. >> she knows, right? >> yes. i'm just trying to get this straight. the germans, they're rich. the germany at this point is -- it reminds me of cas casablanca. germany has not earned its spying outrage with all of their arms dealings and all the -- anyway, we get involved in everything over here, ross. >> there was a report yesterday, annette talked about it out of frankfurt. there was one report in the german press that said it may -- because of hangovers from the laws post the war, it may not be illegal for the u.s. to spy on the -- to listen in on the german fwoft. so there is some debate about whether the u.
calling this president a liar because so many things, you know, benghazi, the n.s.a., the i.r.s., and now this whole health care bill is such a farce. it is a joke. guest: can you tell me what the president lied about when it comes to benghazi? caller: the first thing, we don't know what he was doing. guest: no, we're talking about lying. you said the president was lying about benghazi. can you give an example? caller: everybody covers for him. he doesn't have to answer for anything. all he ever does, he's out campaigning all the time and he's supposed to be a president. i'd like to ask you, why is he a president? he doesn't lead. he doesn't do anything. all he does is go out there and agitate people. he's a community agitator. he has divided this country and we don't want anything part of your leftist progressive views. host: let's give him a chance to respond. guest: well, i don't know how to respond to that. she wanted to talk about lying but she didn't have an example. if you want to get into this stuff, i think you need to be -- have some specifics. but she says the president doesn't
for nsa. everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? but here's what we do. when we get when we get together -- well maybe a couple of times we've wine, but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program would result in a nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs and having given them up and having the nation or the allies. they defended the program and the house intelligence committee meeting. saturday morning at ten eastern. blasÉ sunday at c-span2 your calls and comments >> asad nassa's future goes, so too does that of america. if nassa is healthy, then you don't need a program to convince people that science and engineering is good to do because you will see it at large on the paper. it will be called for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is an ocean of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we will dig through the soil and look for life that will give me the best biologists. look
that this is connected in a way of the mourdock family in ways that we didn't appreciate. >> connected to the nsa? is this about phone hacking? >> this is about phone hacking. >> we know and don't say anything. >> whether this touches the mourdock family, does rebekah brooks try to rat out the family? i don't think so. becky, in the u.k. do they change the laws around the press? there's been some talk about trying to beef up the laws. some things that would protect the press in good ways but other things that would make it much more difficult. >> are we tamer here than mourdock's tabloids? >> yes. >> we are until we know otherwise but i think we are. >> this couldn't have been more ridiculous. >> that's? >> the new york snoes. >> geno's interceptions cause -- >> the post, you love it? >> they're one step above blogging. >> it's an early read every morning. >> fiction. >> that's fine too. >> when we come back, we're going to take a look at the markets and this week's fed meeting. first, a very happy birthday to bill gates. the microsoft founder turns 58 today. ♪ ♪ (vo) you are a business pro.
-- ns -- n.s.a. and sinced at administration has said there was unspecified inaccuracies in these reports about the revelations, can you say that that was what you were talking about? >> you want to specify what the unspecified inaccuracies might be? we have important cooperative relationships with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)